The Black Book Of Communism
Stephane Courtois & al
        

1. The communists, trumpeting their humanism, hoodwinked millions around the globe ...so got away with murder on the ultimate scale... (p xv)
Communist regimes...were criminal enterprises:...they all ruled lawlessly. by violence, and without regard for human life. (p xvii)

2. A rough estimate of the scale and gravity of communists' crimes:
                 -USSR   20 Million deaths
                 -China   65 M
                 -Vietnam   1 M
                 -North Korea   2 M
                 -Cambodia   2 M
                 -Afghanistan   1.5 M
                 -Eastern Europe   1 M and so on.
The total approaches 100 M people killed...These are crimes against humanity... (pp. 4-5)

3. In 1945, the Vietnamese communists systematically killed the nationalist Dai Viet members in the North (send an electricity generator and a specialist so that they could torture "traitors") and set up "traitor elimination committees in the South. (pp 566-567)

4. a. During the 1954-55 land reform resulted in 50,000 executions and 50-100,000 imprisoned.
    b. "It was better to have killed your father and mother and admitted it than to say nothing and to have done nothing wrong at all."
    c. Le Duc Tho, Nobel Prize winner : "...to convince the peasants to take up arms, you have to fill them with hatred for the enemy." (pp 569-570)

5. a. During the North-South war (1955-1975), the communists' prisoners were severely abused and often simply liquidated. (p 570)
    b. During the 1968 Tet Offensive in Hue, 3,000 civilians were massacred, including Vietnamese priests, French religious workers, German doctors...Some of the victims were buried alive. (p 572)
    c. After 1975, close to 1 million out of 20 M South Vietnamese were sent to reeducation camps. They were isolated, starved (200 grams of rice filled with stones per day), beaten, tortured, and sometimes executed... Eighty prisoners were locked in a cell built for 20, and 40,000 people crammed in the 8,000 Chi Hoa jail. (pp 572-574)